Life, Death and Change

February 10th, 2014

 

 

 

Mum photo Sussie photo

 

(In memory of Dorothy and Sussie)

 

 

Late last year I returned to Australia to attend the funeral of my mother. Within two weeks of my return to Sweden a close friend died after a sudden acceleration in her illness.

 

 

Death is an uncomfortable subject for many yet it is one of the few absolutes in this world of relativity. Although death involves loss it often the only aspect that is focused upon by those in grief. If we are paying attention however we may notice how much new inspiration and change happens around it like rings spreading out in a pool from the central impact.

 

 

Energy and transformation

 

 

One scientific principle we hear over and over again is that energy is never lost. In terms of energy-consciousness this is not a blog about where it may go but about the transformative effect of its release on those left ‘behind’ in the world of form. Let us first look at one perspective of how this conscious energy works in human life and death.

 

 

Now and Shen

 

cosmic-consciousness-2-216x300

 

Many times in these blogs we have mentioned the concept of chi-energy having its expression as consciousness in a sentient being. In traditional Chinese medicine this guiding consciousness finds its expression in what is called the Shen. The Shen may be seen as the guiding software of consciousness – the essential difference between someone who is living and an inanimate corpse. 1

 

 

From this perspective the process of dying is described as the Shen ending its contract with the physical body and leaving its home in the heart. Our ‘earth suit interface’ of the physical body however remains the property of Mother Earth and is reclaimed once again.

 

 

Indeed from a point of view of all physical form, if we were to view it through a very high speed camera all life would appear to be bursting forth from and being reabsorbed into the earth over and over again.

 

 

 

Death and change

 

 

Robin Wood tarot deck.  All rights reserved

Robin Wood tarot deck.
All rights reserved

 

In the tarot card deck the card for change is the symbol of death. This tells us that what appears (from the perspective of form) to be an ending is really something that is shifting through or across the world of form – literally a trans-form-ation.

 

 

When someone we have a shared consciousness with – that is, someone important to our heart – dies to the world of form, a great potential for transformation is liberated.

 

 

A parting gift

 

 

I have observed countless times how a loss of life also gives and inspires others to make a transformation in their own lives. Stuck patterns begin to shift and re-evaluations are made. Inspiration (literally: to be filled with spirit) to follow one’s heart and find courage replaces fears that have previously held us back in self-imposed limitation.

 

 

Death reminds us of the value of life. It can then function as a parting gift to drive change and enable us to live life more fully and purposely – to ‘follow our heart’ (the house of the Shen).

 

 

Don’t be sad its over. Be glad it happened.

 

 

If energy is never lost then it is there to be used over and over again. If we can love once, we can love ten thousand times.

 

Death need not be a focus for loss but an appreciation of what has been transformed, in us.

 

 

Till another Monday renews itself once more, a little wiser for the experience.

 

 

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1 Unfortunately, science –  that essentially replaced religion (in the West at least) as the dominant source of knowledge – does not recognize a software metaphor in its application to medicine and human life. As such it continues to treat the body as a kind of Frankenstein’s monster that contain parts to be manipulated and its treatment strategies reflect this. The spirit is dismissed as a quaint, superstitious appendage from a more primitive time or at best a private matter not for inclusion in the public debate, let alone medical treatment.

 

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© Jeremy Halpin all rights reserved. All images are the author’s own unless otherwise indicated or if the original source is unknown at the time of writing. Sussie’s photo by kind permission of James Koutsakis.

 

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